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Travel tips Archives - Page 2 of 2 - Air Canada Vacations

27 Oct

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How to Get the Christmas or New Year’s Vacation You Want

October 27, 2014 | By |

Seeking refuge in the hot Caribbean or Mexican sun this holiday season? If you’re thinking of trading in your winter boots to celebrate the holidays in your bathing suit, better get a head start and plan smart. Here’s how to get exactly the vacation you want, at the price you want, and ensure your travel goes as smoothly as possible:

Book early to get your destination and resort of choice

The period between mid-December to early January is a peak travel period, which means vacation packages during this time sell out very quickly. If you want to get the best choice of destinations, as well as resorts (including those with Privileges – things like preferred room location, free Wi-Fi and guaranteed à la carte reservations), you’ll want to get on that fast.

Book early to save

There is a misconception that the longer you wait to book your travel, the better a discount you will get. Truth is, if you wait until the last minute, not only might you not get what you want, but you’ll miss out on very appealing deals like these. There’s a reason why they say the early bird catches the worm…

Be extra sure you’ve gotten the absolute best price

Air Canada Vacations offers a Best Price Guarantee on all our destinations. That means that if you book a package with us and you find a lower price elsewhere within 24 hours of your initial reservation, we'll refund you the difference, up to $400 per booking.

Save time at the airport by checking in online

Winter weather is sometimes unpredictable. If driving conditions are less than ideal on your departure date, this may mean more time in getting to the airport. If you do not plan to check a bag and want to save time at the airport, then check into your flight online. You can check in as early as 24 hours before your flight and can either print your boarding pass at home, print it at a self-service check-in kiosk at the airport, or opt to receive an electronic boarding pass.

Ready to start planning your holiday travel? Get the vacation you want now!

 

02 Jul

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Jamaican Slang You Should Know Before Travelling

July 2, 2014 | By |

Before visiting a destination where the people speak a language different from your native tongue, it is a good idea to learn a few words and phrases from the language that they speak. Doing this can help you navigate, do simple tasks like ordering food or thanking a person. It is also a common courtesy to the people you are interacting with. You might not be able to speak their language fluently, but that small amount of effort and being polite could really help you out and go a long way in regards to them being willing to help you out in return.

The official language of Jamaica is English and you should be able to travel throughout the country without having any problems communicating. However, if you really want to impress and get to know the locals, then it might be a good idea to learn a bit of their other language known as Jamaican Patois.

What to know about Patois

Patois (pronounced like Patwah), is known by linguists as Jamaican Creole. It is mainly based on the English language with different uses of grammar, mixed with various African languages, native words and even a bit of Irish English.

Jamaican Patois is more often spoken than written and one of the hardest parts about learning the language is that it isn’t legally recognized. Because of that, the language isn’t standardized either. This means that there are many variations of different sayings and many variations as to how things are spelled as well, with no one way being wrong.

Key phrases travellers to Jamaica should know

Often times you will find that the Patois word compared to the English word is an altered direct translation like “Thank You” being “Tank yuh”. Other times the Patios version might be more of an explanation of what you are trying to say in English. An example of this is “Goodbye” being “Walk good” which is like saying, “take care” or “travel safe”. If you think about it too much it might be harder for you to learn. This is the type of language that just kind of flows out of your mouth.

To begin, here are a few Jamaican slang expressions you should know before travelling. Some of these are very basic words that you would want to know or at least get an understanding of before visiting Jamaica.

Hello = “Yes sah” or a more casual greeting would be “whaa gwaan” which is the equivalent to “What’s up?”. There are numerous variations for greeting someone, which also include: “Whap’am” and “How yuh stay?” which means “How are you?”.

An appropriate response to one of these greetings might be “irie” which means “alright” or “fine”.

Good Bye = “Walk Good” or “lata”

Thank You = “Tank yuh”

Yes = “Yah man”

No = “Nuh” or “No sah”

Drink = “drinkz”

Water = “watta”

Eat = “nyam”

How much is this? = “Ow much is dis?”

Examples of more advanced expressions for the adventurous linguists

If you think you have an ear for languages and you want to be able to communicate a bit more with the locals, then these few expressions and phrases might help you out.

Perhaps you are looking for directions?

Show me where this is located = “Mek I know weh dis deh”

Where is the bus stop? = “Weh di bus tap deh?”

Or maybe you want to make some small talk?

Who sings this song? = “A who sing da sang ya?”

Where is the party? – “Wich paaat di paaty deh?”

What are you doing? = “Wha yuh a do?”

Tips for meeting the locals and practicing the language

Now that you have a handle on the lingo, it is time to meet some locals, try out what you have learned and perhaps learn more from first-hand conversations. Jamaica Local Rastafarian

If you are staying at a resort during your vacation, the best place to start is at the bar. Pick a time of day where the hotel bar is not overwhelmed, take a seat at the bar, grab a drink and strike up a conversation with the bartender, preferably a local. Hotels are all about customer service and most bartenders love to chat, so this is the best way to test out your new skills without going too far outside your comfort zone.

If you feel more comfortable like you have a handle on things, ask the bartender, the concierge or your tour guide where they would suggest you can go to hang out with some locals. Hopefully they will recommend a great local watering hole where you can not only strike up a conversation with some real locals, but you might also get the chance to try some great local fare.

A few key phrases to know for customer service interactions

Aside from common pleasantries and small talk, it is also a good idea to figure out a few phrases of Patois that relate to customer service. From shopping at a market, to getting service at a restaurant or bar, here are some prime examples.

How much is this? = “Ow much is dis?”

What is that? = “A wah dat?”

Can I have… = “Cyan I ave…”

Can I order? = “Cyan I orda?”

What is the best? = “Wah is di bess?”

I like this. = “Mi like dis.”

Funny expressions

Learning a new language can be a fun experience and is a great way to expand your mind. As with learning any language, it is always fun to not only learn the most common words to help you get by, but also to learn a few funny words and phrases as well. Here are a few you might enjoy.

“Blabba mout” = Someone who talks too much.

“De olda de moon, de brigher it shines” = The older a person is, the wiser.

“Wanti wanti can’t get it, getti getti no want it.” = The grass isn't always greener on the other side.

These few words and phrases should get you started talking like a Jamaican local or at least help you attempt to communicate with them. Don’t forget that being polite, saying “please” and “thank you” can really go a long way. Hopefully they will inspire you to learn more and feel more comfortable speaking with the locals.

Remember that English is the native language of Jamaica, so you don’t need to learn Jamaican Patois to travel there. These suggestions are just for fun and they might help you understand some of the reggae music that you are sure to hear.

 

References:

www.ackee.com

www.speakJamaican.com

www.talk8tive.com

http://jamaicanize.com/translate

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica#Language

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaican_Patois

http://www.reference.com/motif/reference/how-do-you-say-hi-in-patois

http://jamaicanpatwah.com/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klvvBLqvecg

http://shoery.com

http://www.tripadvisor.ca/Travel-g147309-s604/Jamaica:Caribbean:Important.Phrases.html

http://www.visitjamaica.com/feel-the-vibe/patois/a-few-good-words-to-know

http://growingupjamaican.com/jamaican-english-phrases/

03 Jun

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6 Slices of Heaven: Jamaica for the First Time Traveller

June 3, 2014 | By |

Jamaica’s vibrant culture, magnificent beaches, thriving reefs and jungles, and bustling cities make this island the perfect destination for anyone who needs to get away, relax, and live it up for a while. This Caribbean island is well known for being a stopping place for many cruises and honeymooners, so resorts, water sports, and other services catering to tourists are in abundance. Why does Jamaica have so much appeal to Canadians? Perhaps it’s the mouthwatering Caribbean cuisine. It could be the natural beauty of the island. Or that Jamaican culture varies so widely from the cultures of other countries Canadians might have visited, such as Cuba, the Dominican Republic, or Mexico. If this is your first time travelling to Jamaica, choose the part of the island which best suits your needs and consider your options for what you definitely don’t want to miss and the many possibilities you haven’t thought about yet as you determine what to do in Jamaica.

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18 Nov

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Tips to stay connected while you’re away!

November 18, 2013 | By |

Travelling in the digital age is an amazing thing, but before you pack those charger cables, here are some crucial tips you need to know.

Buy an international plan before you go

Most travellers make the mistake of calling their providers at destination, usually after receiving an urgent message from accounts! When buying a plan, be realistic about how much data, calling and text messaging you expect to do. Find out if your plan offers preferential roaming rates and/or if the plan includes a limited amount of data and airtime. Also, don’t forget to ask about charges if you go over the limit.

Shut off data roaming

Even if you have purchased an international plan, turn off your data roaming when possible — or even better, switch into airplane mode when you’re not using the device. In doing so, you are reducing the risk of accidentally incurring additional charges. This means getting to know the settings of your device before you leave!

Turn off notifications and alerts

Although you may love the alerts that pop up on your screen, letting you know that an email has come in or that you’ve been retweeted, every alert represents a data transfer. And that could mean extra charges. Perhaps use airport waiting  time to deactivate those alerts!

Regularly check usage to make sure that you’re not going over

If you’ve purchased a plan, it’s crucial to track your data transfers, text messages and phone calls while on your trip. The easiest way? Log in to your profile on the website of your service provider and check your numbers on a regular basis. That way, if you need more, you can contact your provider for an additional package.

Use WiFito make calls and send texts

In addition to Skype and Facetime, there are a number of other apps that will let you make phone calls and send texts — free of charge or for a nominal fee — over an Internet connection. This will not only save you money, but it’s also a worry- free way to stay in touch with loved ones.

01 May

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Cuba, from tip to tip

May 1, 2013 | By |

From tip to tip, every part of this great island offers a unique mix of history, music, art, passion and beauty – as unique and warm as the sun in the sky.

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19 Jan

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Choosing a cruise

January 19, 2011 | By |

There are many ways of choosing a cruise, such as following in the footsteps of friends who are just back from a trip that stirred their passions, but as a veteran of 200 sailings, let me tell you the best way: go to a professional who knows the business such as a cruise specialist at Air Canada Vacations or a travel agency.

 

They know what’s out there, and they want to sell you a vacation that you will love. Why? Because they want you to come back with a smile on your face and give them more business. It’s as simple as that.

But first, think about where you want to go and when. There are a lot of choices, with dozens of ships of all sizes, at vastly different price levels and offering something for everyone.

For starters, who’s going? Some ships are better for couples, others suit children, while a few specialize in weddings with the captain doing the honours. Ships are great for families, sometimes several generations, who will have their own spaces, but can get together easily, such as for dinner.

Yes, meals are served on board (the understatement of the year) but you don’t have to put on weight because the newer vessels have fabulous spas and tremendous gyms to help you stay in shape. In fact, spas have become a very important part of cruising.

Sports fans who choose the right ship are well catered to with live, big-screen showings of top games, while I know from experience that Carnival Cruise Lines has a big golf program with rental clubs and shoes on board.

And if you want nightlife, Royal Caribbean International will find a way to keep you up all night.

Fact is, modern cruise ships are floating resorts. But why not see some of the world at the same time? There are epic destinations out there. A Mediterranean cruise, for example, can let you spend a night out in Monte Carlo or a day exploring Tuscany. In Spain, visit the Alhambra in Granada, while a Baltic cruise is the easy way to get to the treasures of St. Petersburg.

Closer to home, there’s the colonial charm of Bermuda, diving in the Bahamas, the thrill of a Panama Canal transit and ships that will let you go down the gangway to the beat of the samba. And almost anywhere, you can go shopping!

Be prepared to find the experience of cruising addictive, so regard your first trip as base camp. You might start with a honeymoon cruise to a faraway place, enjoy fun getaways in the Caribbean, and one day take the kids on a Disney cruise.

I’d start with a short cruise, say a week, and nothing too complicated. If you’re close to the east coast, choose a sailing out of Miami or thereabouts. Westerners might want a sailing from Los Angeles or Hawaii.

And while the big, new ships are so stable you hardly know you’re moving, if in doubt, ask for a cabin in the middle of the ship and on a lower deck. It will likely be cheaper too, and nothing wrong with that!

By David Wishart, who likes to write about cruises, and has taken more than 200 of them.